hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects builds treehouse in japan

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‘tree hut on volcano’ gives a gateway from the bustling metropolis

 

discovering a tiny open house among the many timber, hiroshi nakamura and NAP architects has nestled a treehouse, searching for the richness of the minimal life. the purchasers, a pair with a profound love for nature and minimalist life-style, began an organization promoting tiny homes, commissioning the architects to design the prototype. 

 

the ensuing composition topped by a wood hut and penetrated by a dogwood tree is positioned on the junction level between craftsmanship, sculpture, and structure. settled about two kilometers from owakudani, a volcanic valley in japan crammed with sulfuric plumes, the treehouse spans 19sqm in a construction that’s lifted round 5 meters above the bottom. by erecting the amount, the design workforce aimed to keep away from the visibility of the close by streets and the heavy air containing hydrogen sulfide and moisture flowing close to the bottom floor. this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal lifeall pictures by koji fujii / toreal

 

 

treehouse: an archetype of habitats

 

based on the purchasers’ necessities, the design strives to create a gateway from the bustling metropolis. the treehouse rests on stable metal columns 15cm in diameter, whereas the doorway is realized by means of a staircase that blends with the forest. the spherical deck on which stands all the development is pierced by a tree, creating shade in the summertime and daylight in winter when it sheds its leaves. in the meantime, the three columns are designed to sway barely when the wind blows or inhabitants transfer. 

 

regardless of the restrictions of house, it consists of all of the requirements and comforts for its inhabitants. the inside evokes tones of the encompassing panorama, offering a heat and intimate environment. a big south-facing window opens in the direction of the forest, making a separation from the mundane world. elegant gentle downpours from the skylight — shaped by the best level of the hut — making a serene environment round a custom-made fire, the place guests can relaxation and benefit from the views. this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life

 

 

the central house resembles a shrine, searching for to mirror its wealthy reference to nature and the sentiment of the folks within the area for the neighboring mountain kamiyama. ‘the 2 branched-log pillars within the north are positioned in symmetry like a shrine gate, indicating {that a} sanctuary lies past. when viewing from deep within the room, one’s perspective of the trapezoidal plan is corrected and a sq. house seems, inside which the sacred fireplace stand enshrines, comparable to the holy fireplace earlier than a buddhist alter and the shinto shrine’s fireplace burning ceremony,’ the architects talked about. ‘the challenge is basically an experiment searching for the richness of a frugal life lived with delicate sensitivity in the direction of nature and faith-like humility.’

this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life
topped by a hut-like roof

this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life
a skylight opening in the direction of the sky

this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life
evoking tones of the encompassing panorama

this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life
a serene environment to mirror

this treehouse by hiroshi nakamura & NAP architects seeks the richness of a frugal life

 

 

challenge information:

 

title: tree hut on volcano

architects: hiroshi nakamura and NAP architects

completion: 2020.10
construction: T+S
constructor: double field

manufacturing: transit normal workplace inc.
website space: 999 sqm
complete flooring space: 19 sqm
location: kanagawa, japan 

images: koji fujii / toreal

christina petridou I designboom

jan 28, 2022

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