ASD Assessment Scotland – A Parent’s Guide

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‍Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition that affects about 3% of school-aged children, and possibly an even higher percentage of adolescents. It is characterized by difficulties in attention, impulse control, and impulsiveness. ADHD can be a challenging condition for both the child who has it and their parents or caregivers. Children with ADHD can have difficulties at home, at school and with friends as a result of the symptoms of the condition. For many parents, getting a asd assessment scotland for their child and learning more about the condition can be overwhelming. This guide is here to help you understand what ADHD is, how it is diagnosed, what treatment options are available for your child and how you can get support as a parent if your child has been diagnosed with ADHD.

What is ADHD?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental condition. This means that the brain is maturing and developing more slowly than it should. The three main symptoms of ADHD are inattention, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity. The symptoms of ADHD will present differently in every child. They will also change as your child grows and develops. Even if your child has never been diagnosed with ADHD, they may display some of these behaviours from time to time. Children and adolescents who have ADHD have difficulty paying attention and concentrating, and often have impulsive behaviours that can lead to problems with friends, at school and at home.

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The Symptoms of ADHD

Inattention – A difficulty in focusing on tasks at hand, such as homework or household chores. This can make the child easily distracted and forgetful. Hyperactivity – A child who fidgets, can’t sit still or is constantly on the go. Hyperactive children often have trouble remaining seated or completing tasks one at a time. Impulsiveness – Behaviours that are rash or inappropriate for the situation. This includes having trouble waiting for one’s turn, blurting out answers before others have finished speaking, and interrupting others when they’re talking. The symptoms of ADHD usually become apparent before a child reaches 10 years old. Most children with ADHD are between the ages of 6 and 12. The symptoms of ADHD may be more obvious in adolescence when hormones are changing and affecting the brain and body.

How is ADHD Diagnosed?

A professional will diagnose ADHD based on a checklist of symptoms that they have identified in your child. But they also need to rule out other conditions that have similar symptoms, such as anxiety and depression. They may also take into account your child’s developmental history. This could include developmental catch-up, developmental delay, and any other medical conditions or factors that might be contributing to your child’s inattention and hyperactivity. A diagnosis of ADHD is not a diagnosis of a disease or an inherent deficit of intelligence. It is a description of a specific set of behaviours. ADHD is a commonly diagnosed disorder. There is always a chance, however, that a checklist of symptoms doesn’t sound like your child.

Treating ADHD

Treatment for ADHD can help reduce the symptoms of ADHD and enable your child to be a happier, more productive person. A treatment plan that may include one or several of the following elements: Parenting – This can include learning ways to help your child reduce the symptoms associated with ADHD and improve their self-regulation. It may also include behavioural coaching and parent management training to help you learn more effective ways to communicate with your child. Education – This can include counselling and specialised tutoring for your child at home or in a specialised school. Medications – These can be used to treat the symptoms of ADHD and enable your child to learn and thrive.

Key Takeaway

ADHD is a common condition affecting about 3% of school-aged children and an even higher percentage of adolescents. It is characterized by difficulties in attention, impulse control, and impulsiveness. The symptoms of ADHD usually become apparent before a child reaches 10 years old. There is always a chance, however, that a checklist of symptoms doesn’t sound like your child. A diagnosis of ADHD is not a diagnosis of a disease or an inherent deficit of intelligence. It is a description of a specific set of behaviours. Treatment for ADHD can help reduce the symptoms of ADHD and enable your child to be a happier, more productive person. It can be a challenging condition for both the child who has it and their parents or caregivers. Children with ADHD can have difficulties at home, at school and with friends as a result of the symptoms of the condition.

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